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Roman Rings

Rings were a popular form of jewellery worn by the Romans, just as they are today. Most rings and jewellery made of precious metals are highly sought after and expensive works of art, residing in museums or the collections of wealthy art collectors. A wide variety of inexpensive rings can be found in coin and antiquities dealers' shops. The majority of rings available to antiquities collectors and all rings illustrated on this page are cast from bronze. The one at left, second from the top appears to have an intaglio image of a person sacrificing carved into the metal. It is possible that these intaglio rings were also used to impress wax seals on documents, thus serving as a guarantee that the bearer of the ring was the author of the document.

 

 

 

 

 

The ones shown here are some that Marc Bettinger had at his table at one coin show in San Jose, California. These are nicer ones, ranging in price from about twenty dollars on up to a couple of hundred dollars. Most have some form of decorative engraving or an inlay. Some of the plainer rings can be had for five to seven dollars each. The one at lower left is a Roman legionary's ring, displaying a military eagle. It now resides in the author's collection.

 

 

 

 

 

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